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To help all of you in this difficult time, we wanted to share some amazing ideas from a recent insider training (webinar workouts just for our Insiders and Laboratory participants) all for free.

These tactics were too good to keep up with the paid wall, so we pulled this training out of the lab and have a video and transcript here so you can watch and pull out ideas!

Watch the video or keep scrolling to read more!

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Complete transcript

Maya Hugley:

Welcome insiders and members of the DigitalMarketer lab to your insider training, which is also known to some as working hours. For the first time in the video came Maya Hugley, how I look. The presented content coordinator is here at the production and keeps your host. They were also joined by community manager Michelle Dalton. She’s chatting to make sure your questions are sounding, and today Jenna is helping us speak to the speakers. Gina used to be a leader in training and working hours for DigitalMarketer insiders, and is now very happy that Jenna is helping here. When brand new innovations for office hours / insider training are introduced, we cover a variety of specific marketing strategies with new guest experts. Sometimes they live like today and sometimes they don’t, but they are always recorded, and if you are a paid lab member or insider, then the recording will take place in your lab platform on the Insider Training tab for 24 hours.

Maya Hugley:

Of course, live viewing gets the added benefit of answering our guest’s question. This week we have a very special training. It is bad to interview founders and entrepreneurs who have found amazing ways to distort their business during the global crisis. Each interview will only have a few minutes over time for one or two questions at the end. So please put your questions in the chat when you think of them so Michelle gets them to me. Looks like I can’t on camera right now, so let me fix that so you guys can see me. Rather look. Good. Can everyone see me? I think. Put it in chats if you can. Oh, perfect. I’m already on camera. Thanks, Robert. I understand that.

Maya Hugley:

So go ahead and pop in here with some of these interviews. Sure you guys are so excited to hear and get some new strategies for your business as well. All the people who are going through this amazing time, and the people who will be interviewing, are very creative about how to do their business. So, first we have Abigail Gilman from Defective … Sorry, like Tiffany Cooley. Thanks guys for being here. Wantable does amazing things. You guys work for a personal sales company, right? Personal shopping and styling and now make masks and deliver masks. Can you tell a little more about that?

Tiffany Cooley:

Yes, Wantable is … Hi guys. Said Tiffany Cooley, Chief Marketing Officer of Wantable. Wantable – Try before you buy a personal styling firm. We cater primarily to demographics, but we’ve also added men, and we’ve steered our business pretty quickly by hearing everything that’s happening in the world and in the country with COVID-19, and our platform really lends itself to a really simple solution so we can procure customers. who know how to sell… Customers or people who just wanted to help and customize masks. We have excellent paid tolls that they can take on these ships and then ship them and hand out to medical staff and medical staff at the forefront. This led to a really successful campaign.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. I mean, weird to hear. You’ve done such a wonderful job and keep everyone on the front line super appreciating it. Before all this, before the global pandemic, how did you usually do business? Imagine that there was no business plan at all for the delivery of medical staff?

Tiffany Cooley:

No, I mean we are probably very similar to many traditional Comm players or other people in our space. We have a warehouse located in Milwaukee. We worked mostly in one big shift, mostly Monday through Friday. Some of the things we did to protect our employees really were to reverse these changes several times over the weekend to just limit contact between people. And then we separated some workflows that came from customers, and separated them from how they ran “So Good Company” with masks and so on.

Tiffany Cooley:

So the good news is that we were actually able to use many of the same technologies and tools as we did when we made these changes and added the last piece to our business. So we had to change a lot. Honestly, there have been much bigger changes in other operational groups in the organization. So, for example, our team with photos, because talking to a group of marketers here was a really big shift for us. We were in the studio shooting products by models, touching goods with our sales teams and had that experience. Thus, getting this digital process has become one of the biggest changes among many. So at this point I’m leaning towards a lot of organic content and UGC.

Maya Hugley:

It makes sense. It makes a lot of sense.

Abigail Gilman:

Yes, in response to what Tiffany said, and I think most people can connect with that in the marketing space, but we plan quite a bit and have strategies for what we’ll be doing for months and quarters ahead. . And it’s hard to say, “Okay, we’ll put it all on the back burner and maybe hopefully someday it will work, but we’re going to have to change all the mechanisms and be really refined in the content we share now, and a little softer on aesthetics that we have, and be sharp and resourceful in what we seek and share images. ”Collaborating cross-functionally with different teams has been a lot of fun and finding ways to generate content from our home offices.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. Bad to hear so well. Feeling that many of our viewers feel the same. I know DigitalMarketer feels the same way. We have videos that are trying to … The video company is trying to make videos without reaching people, which is difficult. So have you found that some of your new strategies have been successful and is there anything you think continues to do in the future because of this?

Tiffany Cooley:

I just said we started … So pre-COVID, I think it’s becoming a time period. As a pre-COVID we started working on the next evolution of our brand. I mean almost seven years, so we worked with the same foundation of our brand for a while. We really wanted to climb on why we were there for customers, and the view back to our roots, was our brand. That’s all before anything happens. What we have found, and what I consider to be truly successful for us, is just leaning faster and more purposefully into messaging to get back to the true roots of our company, to the core values, to simplify, there are many things. The Abi point we had at work and on the table, but I think just trying to get back to core business, to your core values, all the reasons customers come to you and love you, has been very helpful.

Tiffany Cooley:

And then also, as Abby said, saying a lot of the sophistication we have in the messages, in our photography, how we treat company employees and so on. Relying on times with empathy and kindness, and knowing that every employee who is behind a different screen as working in those time periods, something is happening is the same for our customers. So we really made sure we accepted every single customer, every individual employee, knowing that something unique was happening to them, and just unleashing our business model with all the tools we have to help people in the best way. way is possible.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. I believe this is of great importance and I believe that many people use this time to reconnect with what they want to do in the beginning. It’s a great time to do that. So we have another interview question before opening it for chat. So, our last question: which of the first steps would you recommend for a similar business, or maybe just take it if they want to just as well run their business?

Tiffany Cooley:

Yes, I think it helped to take a couple and then Abby, I know I have a lot of really great thoughts on this topic too. Going back to what we said, just to reaffirm that it really focuses on your original brand purpose and simplifies as well as simply applies to our staff. I can speak at the executive team leadership level. We went into this knowing we would need to cut it over a period of time and we actually shut down to protect employees for a week or so. Just knowing that we value our employees and their safety and health above all.

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Tiffany Cooley:

So it was important for us to make sure you had everything set up either on site to be successful but also safe. We were able to relocate some roles that might have had less work if we had slowed things down a bit, cross-used, trained them in other areas. They had such a great learning experience, but we were able to make a number of changes when we changed profits without distracting anyone, and without having to work with anyone, creating teams and combining them. They were incredibly resilient, flexible and agile throughout the process.

Maya Hugley:

The burning is impressive.

Abigail Gilman:

One tip that I will have to turn off when your neighbor’s dog barks.

Maya Hugley:

I appreciate it, thanks for the great advice.

Abigail Gilman:

I just remind myself that we are people who serve people. We all simply work with the best that we have to provide customers with the best service and experience they serve, and simply maintain close contact with all functional groups. I think it’s a really unique and exciting experience trying to work together to hear all of our stories with clients, whether it’s about our so good source search masks and whether to really change the situation in our community and across the country, and just the reaction some of our customers are both affected and how we can use this experience just to build with them a truly strong loyalty. And make sure they understand them here too.

Maya Hugley:

Badly beautiful. The core of all this is man. I really, really like it. Absolutely. Let me see if we have any questions on the Q&A issue. We seem to have additional questions for you, but if someone has a question on which one they are on, or do they want to know more about Wantable, where should we direct them?

Tiffany Cooley:

You can send them to any of our email addresses. I think it was discussed in the leadership of the meeting. Otherwise we could type them in the chat if it also helps.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. So we have Abigail at abigail.gilman@wantable.com, and Tiffany is tiffany.cooley@wantable.com, and if you just want more information about Wantable and you want to support their case of getting masks for frontline workers , you can visit them at wantable.com. Thanks guys for being here. It was so wonderful.

Tiffany Cooley:

Thank you.

Abigail Gilman:

Thank you very much Maya.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. So next to us we have Alice Dushan. Alice Dusan is a nutritionist working in the Austin area, and she had to transfer the entire business to the internet, which, as you know, if you’ve ever been to a nutritionist who lives normally in a personal office. So it went through a huge transition for her. And very excited to hear from her about the changes she had to make and some of the things she had to do to make it happen and to do it for her. So went to bring her here. One second. We are going. How’s Alice going, can you hear me? Well, and I think I hear you. Oh, maybe now I can.

Alice Dushan:

How about this?

Maya Hugley:

Yes. Perfect.

Alice Dushan:

Yes.

Maya Hugley:

How are you?

Alice Dushan:

Collected good. How are you

Maya Hugley:

Accompanied do good. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate you being here.

Alice Dushan:

Yes, my pleasure.

Maya Hugley:

Absolutely. So the first question before all is COVID-19, before this pandemic, how did you usually run your business?

Alice Dushan:

Yes, I have an office outside of Austin, Texas. And so about one hundred percent of my clients were only one at one of our meetings in our office. Incredibly super cozy and personal. So I really enjoyed interacting with them one-on-one while sitting and really doing things with them. We also cook sometimes too together, so a lot of personal stuff before COVID-19. I have always had a tele-sanitary option as a backup. I always viewed this as some sort of last resort when someone was just doing it, either the kids were out of school school or something. So I had it in my pocket, but never saw in it the basic way of doing it.

Maya Hugley:

Started. So what exactly are you doing now to make none of this happen?

Alice Dushan:

That’s right. So we had to … Well, I quickly switched to tele-health. I was very grateful that I have an EHR, an electronic medical card that allows for compatibility with HIPAA. So I was set up. I immediately, when we stayed home, ordered, just sent a message to all my customers and said, “Good news, we can keep going. You went well. We started dating online. Here are the instructions for the next meeting. “I just tried to be really positive and change my thinking, perceiving it as a backup or a last resort as something that could become a really effective tool for my clients that we had to completely slip off during that time. Yeah, yeah, we just switched on body health.I did my best to just say it like this: “It’s great. Lucky so we can move forward that way. ”Yes.

Maya Hugley:

What did the customer respond to? Gathered sure that they all faced, the same order of the house remained. But have you received any returns or any really positive reactions to full internet access?

Alice Dushan:

Yes, I would say about 75% were fine with the transition, ready to go. I got a rollback. People who are less comfortable using technology continue to like the idea of ​​doing things across the screen. So I definitely had a certain responsibility. The requirement for these platforms to comply with HIPAA during the season was suspended, which allowed me to survive them to cross some people. To be able to use anything as long as they realize it’s not as secure a platform as FaceTime, or anything, in this first session there was always a goal to move to a more secure platform that it was nice to make people I not used to.

Alice Dushan:

We had a few, very small percentage of customers who were very nervous, and one in particular thought they wanted to do it. I once said, “Hang in there and give it a try.” Then she was so excited because it was clear that in the future she might meet me for lunch at work and not shoot the afternoon to see me. And so she moved during one meeting to “I just want to do it from now on. It’s much more convenient.” So it was a pleasant surprise to see that some people really think it’s better. And I think ultimately the strength to do it well and for me to learn tele-health really well will be an added benefit for customers in the future. And I’m not just looking at this as a final scenario, but I may offer another service in the future. The good view thus drove me out of my comfort zone.

Maya Hugley:

Yes, this actually leads to my next question: are there any aspects in this that you think you will do after a pandemic? But it seems that we have learned a lot of new things that you can continue as part of your business even after you cancel at home.

Alice Dushan:

That’s right. So I think the benefit is clearly determined by some skills learned. I have a lot of teen clients, and so truly brainstorming with other people working in health care and other nutritionists and getting tips on how to save, especially young clients dealing with the screen, has been a problem at the time. But much has been learned. It also made me study the laws of health care and compliance with insurance rules, and it’s all better. Гэта настолькі пераканаўчы рост для мяне, што я думаю, што гэта прынясе карысць гэтай практыцы ў будучыні.

Майя Х’юлі:

Гэта мае шмат сэнсу. Гэта ўражліва. Усе так шмат вучацца пра тое, як працуе іх бізнес, і пра тое, што яны могуць зрабіць, каб зрабіць яго лепшым у цэлым. Такім чынам, апошняе пытанне – якія першыя крокі вы можаце парэкамендаваць каму-небудзь з аналагічнай галіны ці таму, хто прывык сустракацца з кліентамі адзін на адзін, калі яны хочуць зрабіць онлайн-суворыт?

Аліса Душан:

Правільна. Такім чынам, што-то было для мяне неацэнным, некаторыя прыватныя групы ў Фэйсбуку, якія ўваходзяць у склад гэтых канкрэтных дыетолагаў у прыватнай практыцы, як месца для рэальнага мазгавога штурму. І таму мы былі так удзячныя людзям, якія з’яўляюцца бізнес-трэнерамі ў гэтай галіне, альбо іншым людзям, дзе мы сапраўды можам мазгавы штурм: “Гэй, гэта працуе для мяне. Што для вас працуе? ” Мы таксама спецыялізуемся на адной з груп, якія ў мяне ёсць для страхавання дыетолагаў у прыватнай практыцы, электроннай табліцы, якая агульная, дзе мы змяшчаем інфармацыю для розных страхавых кампаній, якія коды працуюць, падобныя рэчы. Такім чынам, я б сказаў, каб сеткі, каб знайсці гэтыя месцы, наняць бізнес-трэнер, які там быў, і не спрабуйце зрабіць гэта самастойна, таму што чалавечыя рэсурсы, якія перадаюць мяне, разумеюць гэтыя рэчы больш і здольныя задаваць пытанні і сапраўды дзяліцца, каб мы ўсе разам узнімаліся ў гэтай сітуацыі для мяне неацэнна.

Майя Х’юлі:

Зусім. Дзіўная парада Aston. Гэта мае для мяне шмат сэнсу наладжваць сувязь з аднагодкамі і абавязкова падтрымліваць іншых людзей у вашай галіны. Калі людзі хочуць звязацца з вамі, задаюць вам некалькі пытанняў ці проста даведаюцца больш пра ваш бізнес, ваш сайт alisadusan.com, правільна?

Аліса Душан:

Так. І яны могуць адправіць мне паведамленне адтуль.

Майя Х’юлі:

Добра, вялікі дзякуй за тое, што быў тут, Аліса. Я вельмі цаню гэта.

Аліса Душан:

З задавальненнем.

Майя Х’юлі:

Добра. Такім чынам, далей мы з’елі паглядзець тут. Я павінен атрымаць свой спіс перада мной. Джасцін. Прывітанне Джасцін.

Джасцін Баджан:

Добры дзень.

Майя Х’юлі:

Як справы?

Джасцін Баджан:

Паглядзі на мяне, адразу ў час.

Майя Х’юлі:

Як твае справы? Вы сапраўды.

Джасцін Баджан:

Сабраны добры.

Майя Х’юлі:

Такім чынам, мы можам ісці наперад і скакаць у некаторых пытаннях тут, калі захаваны добры.

Джасцін Баджан:

Вядома.

Майя Х’юлі:

Зусім. Такім чынам, перш за ўсё, перш чым усё працягваецца, як звычайна знаёмыя істоты займаюцца сваёй справай?

Джасцін Баджан:

Мы ішлі на тое, каб наладзіць стасункі з брэндамі, якія нас цікавілі, праз нашы ўласныя сувязі ці злучэнні, калі гэта мае сэнс. І тады, калі б яны мелі патрэбу і тэрміны былі правільныя, мы б ініцыявалі кантракт і зрабілі працу па іх. Пачынаючы са стратэгіі, убіраючыся ў тое, што мы называем аб’явы як аб’екты, а потым выконваем працу, якую вы на самай справе пабачыце ў свеце. І тады мы на самай справе атрымліваем вытворчую кампанію, каб яе здымаць і кіраваць, рэдагаваць, усе гэтыя добрыя рэчы.

Майя Х’юлі:

Зусім. Так прабачце, я разумею, што прапусціў крок тут. Вы працуеце ў кампаніі Familiar Creatures, якая з’яўляецца рэкламным агенцтвам у Рычмандзе, штат Вірджынія, так?

Джасцін Баджан:

Мм-м-м (станоўча).

Майя Х’юлі:

Гэй, мы ідзем. Ідэальна. Таму мы паспелі пагаварыць з вамі таму, што вы бачылі, што вы стварылі вэб-сайт спецыяльна для Рычманда, дапамагаючы малым прадпрыемствам і рэстаранам проста атрымаць там сваё імя, варыянты іх дастаўкі, магчымасці іх бардзюра. Дык ці можаце вы распавесці мне крыху больш пра тое, як мы вядзем бізнес зараз?

Джасцін Баджан:

Пра тое, як ідзе бізнэс у цяперашні час, мысьлім крыху больш актыўна і як мне гэта сказаць, значна больш рэагуючы на ​​сітуацыю з COVID і на тое, што брэнды зараз бываюць ва ўмовах крызісу. І таму быць крыху менш халоднымі і арыентаванымі на продаж і быць значна больш паважлівымі да гэтага моманту і толькі набліжацца да брэндаў, калі мы сапраўды вельмі блізкія да іх, гэта разумнае стаўленне, а потым на адваротным баку, выконваючы працу, якую ён атрымлівае як на нашым сайце, і ў нас ёсць некаторыя іншыя рэчы ў працы, гэта толькі пацвярджае наш вопыт і якасць і проста стварае аснову для гэтага.

Майя Х’юлі:

Зусім.

Джасцін Баджан:

Так.

Майя Х’юлі:

Такім чынам, які гэта быў працэс прыняцця рашэнняў, як зрабіць вароты? Было проста шмат сустрэч, якія размаўлялі пра наступнае ці як гэта адбывалася?

Джасцін Баджан:

Было … Дык вось, не было невялікага агенцтва. І ў прахалодным раёне Рычманда, які называецца Scott’s Addition, яны растуць і раздзіраюцца піваварнямі, прадуктамі харчавання хіпстэраў, рэстаранамі, прадуктовымі крамамі і інш. І мы проста падумалі, што гэта як 14 ці 15 сакавіка. COVID працягваў біць Поўнач, Захад, а потым пачаў ісці Поўдзень.

Джасцін Баджан:

Такім чынам, гэта стала для нас рэальным у сярэдзіне сакавіка. І таму мы проста былі: “Гэй, вы ведаеце, што? Ва ўсіх гэтых месцах, што, чорта, з імі здарыцца? ” І мы проста пачалі хутка думаць на месцы, абмяркоўвалі, як мы ўсё робім, думаем пра нешта, а потым проста робім. І таму мы падумалі: чым мы можам дапамагчы гэтым рэстаранам і гэтым броварам мець добрую URL? Мы думалі пра некалькі, “Keep Calm and Nom On” затрымаліся, і гэта было на шчасце.

Дакладчык 1:

З незразумелай прычыны выдатная.

Джасцін Баджан:

А потым мы пачалі працаваць над ім у пятніцу, а ў выхадныя ў нас была палова зроблена, а ў панядзелак мы пачалі яе сур’ёзна. Так і адбылося напэўна.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Такім чынам, вы перабіралі і знаходзілі новыя спосабы вядзення бізнесу і падобных рэчаў, ці былі ў вас поспехі ў чым-небудзь, якія-небудзь новыя стратэгіі, якія, на вашу думку, ідуць далей, нават пасля таго, як пандэмія скончыцца?

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Джасцін Баджан:

Так. Я думаю, што застаецца ацаніць шкоду ў чаканым эканамічным спадзе. І калі б я мог так сказаць, наша каштоўнасць заўсёды заключаецца ў тым, што мы прыносім вам вялікі вопыт агенцтва і вопыт, але нашмат больш эфектыўна і не так дорага.

Джасцін Баджан:

І такім чынам, пра маркі, якія рухаюцца наперад, будзе яшчэ большае жаданне. І таму мы проста пераконваемся, што гэта адбываецца праз тое, як мы маем зносіны на нашым сайце, пра які мы гаворым у працэсе поўнай перапрацоўкі і як мы гаворым у Instagram, як мы гаворым на LinkedIn і гэтак далей.

Дакладчык 1:

Гэта мае сэнс. Гэта мае шмат сэнсу. Такім чынам, наш апошні пытанне тут, калі ў каго-небудзь ёсць пытанні ў чаце з Джасцінам, дайце мне ведаць і выратаваў некаторыя з іх. Але наш апошні пытанне з нашага боку – ці ёсць у нас некаторыя прадстаўнікі нашай аўдыторыі, члены нашай лабараторыі, нашы сертыфікаваныя партнёры, якія маюць агенцтвы. Якія крокі ці некаторыя ідэі вы б рэкамендавалі паспрабаваць зрабіць так, як гэта?

Джасцін Баджан:

Я б сказаў, што гэта адчувае сябе як унутраная рэч, мужная мужнасць. Вам трэба прыкласці калектыўныя намаганні, каб выбіраць паласу руху і ісці па ёй, як у Джаггернаўт ад Людзей Х, і паспрабаваць ліквідаваць старыя і новыя спосабы вядзення бізнесу як мага хутчэй. . І будзьце як мага разумнейшыя ў гэтым, але калі вы адчуваеце сябе правільна, проста зрабіце гэта. І гэта гучыць як нешта з фільма з васьмідзесятых ці што-небудзь, але гэта гаворыць пра тое, каб узяць на сябе разуменне брэнда, які ёсць у нас. Мы лічым сябе прэтэндэнтам на брэнд, хаця гэта сапраўды дапамагае агенцтву, і вы проста проста ведаеце, як рабіць рэчы, і вы проста робіце іх, як толькі зможаце.

Джасцін Баджан:

Дрэнна так шмат, каб зарабіць, зараз маркетолагі адцягваюць і іншае, трымаючы палонную аўдыторыю цэлы дзень, чакаючы смешных рэчаў ці добрага паведамлення. Такім чынам, мы павінны высветліць, як даставіць ім рэчы, якія будуць прыцягваць іх увагу, іх вочныя яблыкі і іншае.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Гэта мае шмат сэнсу, і вы ведаеце, што фільмы васьмідзесятых гадоў – гэта самыя сапраўдныя фільмы, таму гэта мае сэнс толькі для мяне. Вялікі дзякуй за тое, што быў тут, Джасцін. Калі вы хочаце, каб праверыць сайт, які знаёмыя істоты стварылі для Рычманда, захавайце Keepcalmandnomon.com. Калі вы хочаце, каб даведацца больш пра Знаёмыя істоты, спажываў знаёмства.com. І вялікі дзякуй за тое, што вы тут, я цаню ваш час.

Джасцін Баджан:

Так, дзякуй, што запрасілі мяне. Прыемна ўсім сустракацца.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Добра, таму нам шкада. Падобна на тое, што мы, магчыма, крыху выйшлі з ладу там, але працягваем выхоўваць наступнага госця. Я буду працягваць рухацца, таму што я настолькі выдатны змест, што я хачу, каб вы, хлопцы, пачулі пра гэта і так шмат цудоўных паваротаў. Такім чынам, у наступнага ў нас ёсць Джэрэмі Габрыш, і я спадзяюся, што правільна вымавім гэта з Remedy Urgent Care. Джэрэмі, як справы? О, ён быў там на секунду, а потым ён знік на мяне.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Ты мяне чуеш?

Дакладчык 1:

О, я вас чую. Вось ты, ідэальны.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Добрая справа, прывітанне.

Дакладчык 1:

Прывітанне. Як ты?

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Добра, добра. Дзякуй за мяне.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Я цаню, што вы тут. Вы – чалавек таго часу, калі справа даходзіць да медыцынскага абслугоўвання, і тое, што адбываецца зараз, я думаю, што ўсе хочуць пачуць, што такое тэрміновая дапамога, што яны робяць, і ўся медыцына. Але перад усёй пандэміяй, як “Рэмеды” рэгулярна займаўся бізнесам?

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Так, гэта крыху ўнікальны выпадак, у тым сэнсе, што мы на самой справе не моцна змянілі нашу бізнес-мадэль. Такім чынам, прадастаўленне паслугі хатняга званка, віртуальнай службы візітаў, як заўжды, было вялікім прыхільнікам медыцынскай дапамогі за межамі чатырох сценак клінікі. Калі ласка, добра, як пастаянна гэта рабіла. І таму, калі што-небудзь, рэч COVID-19 як бы свяціла тое, як мы робім справы.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Так, я маю на ўвазе, у нас, па меншай меры, на рынку Осціна, у нас не было ні адной паліклінікі, якой мы на самай справе не працавалі падчас COVID-19, а замест гэтага накіравалі на праезд праз выпрабавальны комплекс. Такім чынам, мы крыху змянілі тое, што мы рабілі, у асноўным вакол патрэбаў зрабіць больш вялікія аб’ёмы. Такім чынам, у нас было шмат людзей, якія хацелі здаць аналіз на COVID, альбо, магчыма, яны думалі, што ў іх ёсць COVID, але, магчыма, яны хацелі здаць аналіз на стрэп, грып ці нешта яшчэ. І таму нам спатрэбіўся спосаб зрабіць гэта шмат эфектыўна. Такім чынам, мы пачалі ездзіць па месцах па гэтай прычыне.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Гэта мае шмат сэнсу. Удзячны гэтаму за тое, што я ў Осціне. Так што калі прыйдзе час, мы абавязкова шукаем вас, хлопцы. Што тычыцца прыняцця гэтага стрыжня, ​​як выглядала рашэнне? Калі вы вырашылі закрыць праверку клінікі, калі вы вырашылі спыніцца на аб’ёме, ці была цэлая каманда, якая мела справу з гэтым?

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Так, гэта было. Так даволі рана мы стварылі спецыяльную групу COVID і выцягнулі лідэраў па ўсёй функцыянальнай вобласці кампаніі. Такім чынам, у нас быў прадстаўнік медсястры, у нас быў прадстаўнік лабараторнай каманды, у нас была прадстаўніца аперацыі і чалавек з маркетынгу. І таму мы ў асноўным падобныя на шафу COVID на 10 чалавек, гэта тое, што мы іх называлі.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

І таму мы пачалі рэгулярна сустракацца, першапачаткова гэта было да таго, як пачалося прытулак, і мы сустрэліся асабіста. Потым прыйшоў дзень, калі мы сказалі: “Добра, хлопцы, мы павінны развесці гэта і зрабіць усё дома”. Але так, я маю на ўвазе, што мы павінны былі прыняць рашэнне перайсці да гэтага. Я маю на ўвазе, што гэта было звязана з ЗІЗ, і калі вы глядзелі навіны, зараз усе ведаюць ЗІЗ, што мне смешна, але асабістыя сродкі абароны, наўрад ці абрэвіятура, якую мы выкарыстоўваем у медыцынскай сферы.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

І сапраўды думкі вакол, як гэта разумна выкарыстаць. Мы заўсёды здзяйснялі хатнія званкі, але праблема з хатнімі званкамі з асабістай асабістай бяспекі заключаецца ў тым, што ты бярэш яго, апранаеш, ідзеш дадому, выходзіш, здымаешся, вяртаешся ў машыну, у цябе ёсць выкінуць яго, выкінуць, сесці ў машыну, а потым выкарыстоўваць новае асабістае паведамленне для кожнага пацыента. І таму гэта сапраўды прымусіла нас ісці, не маючы магчымасці эфектыўна выкарыстоўваць абмежаваную колькасць PBE, калі мы будзем прытрымлівацца тэлефанаванняў. Такім чынам, мы на самай справе робім вельмі мала хатніх тэлефонных званкоў, і замест гэтага мы ў асноўным манеўруем гэты бізнэс на наш праезд па месцах.

Дакладчык 1:

Гэта мае сэнс.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Так. І такім чынам нашы людзі могуць накшталт таго, яны могуць апрануцца, і яны апрануты, яны атрымліваюць маску і ўсё такое. А потым людзі проста праяжджаюць праз свае машыны, коцячыся ў акне, вы робіце тое, што вам трэба зрабіць. Але мы можам захаваць колькасць ЛПС, якое мы выкарыстоўваем у той сітуацыі.

Дакладчык 1:

Правільна. Гэта мае шмат сэнсу. Ці былі ў вас праблемы з павелічэннем попыту, проста ў цэлым на вашыя паслугі?

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

Так. Я маю на ўвазе, наш аб’ём вырас на тысячу адсоткаў.

Дакладчык 1:

О, хлопчык.

Джэрэмі Габрыш:

З мінулага года. Такім чынам, барацьба з вялікім скокам аб’ёму, але адна з цікавых рэчаў заключаецца ў тым, што шмат традыцыйных цагляных і мінамётных клінік і памяшканняў менш занята, чым раней. На жаль, некаторыя з іх, на жаль, захапіліся. І змаглі прыцягнуць некаторых з гэтых людзей і вярнуць іх, аказваючы медыцынскую дапамогу на перадавой лініі, проста праз відэа, а не так, як яны гэта робяць.

Дакладчык 1:

Зусім. Такім чынам, яшчэ адно пытанне. And for anyone that is in a similar industry, so we’ll say the healthcare industry, that is trying to figure out maybe to emulate a little bit of what you do, or to maybe have an online option, what are some steps that you might recommend?

Jeremy Gabrysch:

Yeah. I mean, there are some third party softwares that you can use if you want to get set up for seeing patients virtually. There are several out there that are good, and you can provide your patients with a link that they can click, and then go in and be talking with you virtually.

Jeremy Gabrysch:

I mean, the thing that I keep coming back to is, what is the new normal going to be after this? And so I’m really encouraging medical providers to think about, don’t think about this temporary video solution as, “Okay, we’re going to do this. And then after this is over, we’re going to go back to business as usual.” A lot of patients are trying this and they really like it. I mean, they need to have their medicine refilled or they need something easy and the doc gets on and sees them by video, and it gets taken care of. And the patients are going, “Hey, that was pretty cool.” And so, I’m really advising people, think about how when this is over, maybe you do half of your visits virtually and give people the option. They can come in the office if they want, or they can do it like this.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And I think that’s such good advice, even for the people out there that aren’t in healthcare, is to think about what the strategies they’re doing now can help them in the future. Make some great decisions now that you can kind of keep doing, even after this is over. That’s excellent advice. Thank you so much for being here Jeremy, I really appreciate it. If people want to check out more about Remedy Urgent Care, the website is myremedy.com, correct?

Jeremy Gabrysch:

That’s correct.

Speaker 1:

All right. Well, thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it.

Jeremy Gabrysch:

All right, you’re welcome.

Speaker 1:

All right, I’m having a great time. This is going… I hope you’re taking notes on some of the great advice we’re getting. Next up we have Donnine Souhrada from We Are Teachers. This, if you’re not familiar, is a website for teachers that really helps provide resources, and now they’re helping teachers with resources for teaching online, which is new to a lot of people. So they’re doing some great work, and I’m so happy she’s here to talk about it.

Donnine Souhrada :

And it looks like my video camera [inaudible 00:35:45] there. So let’s see if we can fix that.

Speaker 1:

No worries, can you see me?

Donnine Souhrada :

Hi. Thank you for having me.

Speaker 1:

Perfect. Thank you so much for being here, I really appreciate it. So we can hop right into some questions if you feel okay.

Donnine Souhrada :

Yeah, ready.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. So before all of this, what was We Are Teachers normally doing business wise?

Donnine Souhrada :

Yeah. So We Are Teachers, we are an agency and media brand. So we work with customers that want to expose their brand into schools. And so a lot of things that we were doing were really connecting brands to the school calendar, and what was going on in schools at the time, and making their products, or service, or causes relevant to the school market at that time. And that all shifted, because [inaudible 00:36:42] schools closed, and the school calendar became very different when school became at home. So a big shift overnight when everybody was schooling at home.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. So what was the decision making process like, for changing up the business?

Donnine Souhrada :

Yeah, we pivoted quickly. The working style was great because we’re already a remote team, that’s across the US, so there was just a couple of people that were used to working in an office that we had to send home when buildings closed. And the immediate thing we did is we got our creative director, our editorial director and our program managers together, and we pulled everything that was planning to launch in market over the next 90 days, and just paused it.

Donnine Souhrada :

And we went through each communication strategy for each program, and figured out how to tweak to make it relevant, to make sure we weren’t tone deaf, that we weren’t talking about schools, but instead we’re talking about learning at home. So it was a lot of content switching, and just kind of vocabulary on how we are relevant to the current situation that everybody is in with educating at home. Some of the customers that we are working with, we had to pause their program, because it’s just a classroom or school site solution that can’t be done virtually. So we just paused those. And I think that the key is being super flexible as a company to all your customers, your readers, et cetera, to adapt to the situation, and still be relevant to them and their services.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. And it sounds like you guys were honestly just a really great team kind of making that happen. As far as the pivot that you guys made, are there any successes that you’ve seen from that, that you think you’re just going to keep rolling with in the future?

Donnine Souhrada :

I think that what was interesting is that we really, I think in working with the customers and the clients and the programs, there was just this kind of leaning and trust. We were in such an unknown period, and I think that really talking through, you know, before when you’re working with clients that are thinking about their product launch and when they want to hit the market, and all of the things that are kind of company, product-centric. At this point, you really had to know your users, and how they were going to consume these messages and use what you were offering in this new way. So I think that it gives us more leverage to put the customer first, customer messaging first, and be a little bit less product-centric, and have that validity with the customers when you’re talking about that.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. That makes a lot of sense to me. It looks like I have one more question for you. If there’s anybody who has a question in the chat for We Are Teachers, let me know, Michelle will get it to me. But for anyone who’s in sort of a similar spot as you in a similar business, do you have any recommendations, or just kind of what’s the first step if they’re looking to make a pivot in their business?

Donnine Souhrada :

Yeah. I think the first thing is just, it’s not business as usual. And to be super flexible in adapting to the environment, and that’s both internally and externally. So really taking care of your team members, you know, people aren’t used to working with their significant others in the same house, and having children schooling in the room next door, and so there might need to be some modifications there. And then just taking a look, obviously many live conferences weren’t happening, so you see a lot of digital media is big right now, and lots of innovation happening so quickly, it’s very exciting. So just coming up with ways to serve your readership and your target audience in ways in this environment, and being able to make those pivots very quickly.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. Being sensitive to your customers and to your people and your staff, that makes so much sense. It looks like we do have one question from the chat for you. This question is from Robert, and he wants to know if you can give a specific example of what the end user is getting now.

Donnine Souhrada :

So one of the things that we pivoted and put together really quickly, we have a lot of media on the topic of education on weareteachers.com, but we quickly built a microsite called Learning At Home, because that’s what was happening. And we sent out, we put all of the learning at home resources that our editors can find, and did a call out to companies that were giving free resources to families and educators, that could be online done virtually, that they could be included in our Learning At Home microsite.

Donnine Souhrada :

So that was something new, we went through kind of a lot of existing content and just kind of changed language for classroom use to home use. And now we’re thinking about when we go back to a environment where we can be face to face, and students can be in buildings, how that can again be leveraged for over summer students who may need to work at home because of health issues, et cetera. I think that there will be many purposes for this type of content in the future.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean that makes so much sense, and I’m hoping that it builds a more inclusive, more diverse for all businesses, as they come out on the other side of this.

Donnine Souhrada :

Absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much for being here, Donnine, I’m sorry, am I pronouncing your name correctly?

Donnine Souhrada . That’s fine, yes.

Speaker 1:

Perfect. Sorry, I didn’t want to get that wrong on camera. Thank you so much for being here, Donnine. We super appreciate your time. If you guys want to learn more about We Are Teachers, you can check that out at weareteachers.com.

Speaker 1:

All right. Next up we have Fillip Hord from Horderly. Horderly is an organizing company, and before this you guys were doing in house in home organizing, correct?

Fillip Hord:

Yep, exactly. Go into homes and help them get their kitchens, pantries and closets all in order.

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Speaker 1:

I could certainly use that. How are things working now?

Fillip Hord:

Well we’re not in homes, that’s for sure. That was the biggest change for us, and pretty traumatic, we have about 30 employees and we work in [inaudible 00:44:24] so going from casually, a ton of billable hours and our organizers working full time in people’s homes, to not being able to go into clients’ homes and it being an hourly function and an hourly service, where we charge by the hour and we pay by the hour. It was really devastating, that when the government said no more in home, and just before that even happened, it was the health of our clients and employees was that risk. So we started pulling back and doing certain protocols to be extra safe. But then even that, everyday things changed, and then all of a sudden we had to pivot, make a big shift.

Speaker 1:

Right, absolutely. What was the decision making process like for making a pivot? Because you pivoted to doing online consultations, correct?

Fillip Hord:

Yeah. So decision was really quick. It happened before we, before all in home organizing was canceled, and before we shut that down. Just because we saw it was happening and trending, and there was scare of, you know, once China fully shut down and Italy fully shut down, it’s coming to the West coast of America. So we kind of figured, we’re in New York City, the biggest hub of people right now, in America at least, and we decided to pivot to virtual organizing. And it’s more like coaching and consulting, so if you’ve ever seen the Marie Kondo Netflix show, where she comes and kind of coaches, then leaves and comes back a month later, that’s like what virtual-

Maya:

Got it.

Fillip Hord:

It makes sense, and it’s great for us because now we can reach a much broader audience and we’re working worldwide instead of just in the seven states that we actually have physical organizing. So it was a pivot that needed to be made but kind of pushed us over the edge to expedite it.

Maya:

Absolutely. So, it sounds like this is something that you’re probably going to continue doing even after the stay-at-home orders are lifted.

Fillip Hord:

Yeah, I mean if you can be optimistic in this time and see something at the end of the tunnel that is going to brighten your day, this has forced us to create an entire additional service to our company. So if we can thrive and create it and expedite making it a solid service, the right price, the right amount of protocols, and having the right effect on clients during these however many months. Then when we come out of this, we have a worldwide audience and clientele that we never had before. We have a service that when, say our California team has a recession, but our New York team doesn’t, well, we can virtually organize from anywhere. So, now our team that has less hours are going to get more virtual sessions because you can do it from home.

Maya:

Absolutely.

Fillip Hord:

So it’s just going to make our company more helpful towards our audience and clients moving forward.

Maya:

That’s spectacular, and when you talk about taking lemons and making lemonade, I think that’s the definition of that.

Fillip Hord:

Yeah. It’s making big service adjustments in your company during times like this. It can only boost the morale from your team because this is a worldwide pandemic and it’s affecting everyone and especially small businesses. So, if you can make your team smile and look forward to something, I think that’s really helpful.

Maya:

Yeah. If anyone in our audience has questions for Fillip, you can throw those in the chat. Michelle will get them to me. But we do have one more question for you and it’s, for anyone in a business that might be kind of similar to yours that is now having to transition online, do you have any steps or recommendations you could make to them?

Fillip Hord:

Yeah, well, I have two recommendations just for small business owners or people with small business or as an entrepreneur, we’re like busy body people. First off, something like this happens, a recession, take a breath, read a book, relax, take time for family. That’s step one, because people are freaking out, I’m not making a bunch of money right now. It’s like, that’s all right. Survive. You’re going to get through this. We’re all going to get through this. That’s step one, which has no action item.

Fillip Hord:

Step two would be, move social. Go virtual, even if you have a small following on Instagram, focus on putting out content. There’s three different tiers of people. You might have three different tiers of clients or customers purchasing what you need. A very large audience is the free clientele. If you help the free clientele, the people with little money and more money to help support your business in the future will come along, but why don’t you build up your social media following? All you can do is sit home and make folding videos, if you’re professional organizing, put them on YouTube. If you’re a contractor, do some DIY videos, put those out right now, you’ll see the return down on the road with a new audience and clients that appreciate the free content now.

Maya:

Absolutely. That is such good advice and I hope our audience out there will listen to that and take it and run with it. Thank you so much for being here, Fillip Hord. I so appreciate your time. If people are looking to find out more about Horderly, horderly.com is the website.

Maya:

All right, so thank you so much, guys, for being here. I know we’re running a little behind, but we’re going to keep it moving. Next up, I’m so excited because we have Fae Gershenson. I hope I’m pronouncing your last name correctly, Fae. Fae is a member of our DigitalMarketer lab audience, just like you guys, and she had an amazing pivot with her business, so I’m super excited to hear about it. Thank you for being here, Fae.

Fae Gershenson:

Yeah, totally. Woo-hoo.

Maya:

Woo! Can you tell me a little bit more about Happily Ever Laughter and what you do?

Fae Gershenson:

Yeah, I am the girl that got to be a fairy princess when she grew up. That’s right. I have a staff of 50 wacky entertainers and we travel all over California and perform at hundreds of birthday parties and things every week, but not anymore.

Maya:

Oh, you got to laugh to keep from crying, right? Just a little bit. Just a little bit.

Fae Gershenson:

Yeah.

Maya:

Happily Ever Laughter was all in person, all children’s parties, events before all of this happened and now what does your business look like?

Fae Gershenson:

Now, well, I don’t know because I can’t see anyone, but no, now it’s unbelievable. We are doing virtual shows with children around the world.

Maya:

That’s beautiful.

Fae Gershenson:

We never thought we’d ever leave California. We’re getting bookings every 10 minutes and have ever since we released one video ad. So it’s definitely hitting the right tone for people, which I’ve heard all of you say, and that is number one. Just listen. Listen to what people need.

Maya:

That is spectacular. So, as far as moving this online, what was your sort of decision making process for that?

Fae Gershenson:

It was, okay, we got to figure out how to perform with children, but like double spaced, and then we’ll put them on a towel and we’ll call it a magic carpet. Oh wait, oh the next day. Oh, no more parties at all? What are we going to do? What are we going to do? And I called my co-fairy and said we have to change everything right now. All of it.

Maya:

I mean, yeah.

Fae Gershenson:

It was really an aha moment. There was no, I’m sure everyone’s kind of had this similar thing, it wasn’t a subtle thing. It was like bam, you’ve got to move now.

Maya:

You’ve got to do it right this second. So it sounds like it’s been really successful for you. Is this a new opportunity for you? Are you moving to online parties for the future?

Fae Gershenson:

Yeah, I’m never going to kill this. This is awesome. I mean, the cousins and things that never got to see each other, they finally get to party together. So awesome.

Maya:

Oh, that’s so nice.

Fae Gershenson:

Yeah, I’m stoked, and I’m also excited to fight with worker’s comp more to figure out how we can not pay as much since the girls will just be Zooming.

Maya:

Yes, absolutely. So, how has that, you mentioned the girls, the other fairies. How has their response been as employees? Is this something that they like doing or how has that been?

Fae Gershenson:

Oh, man. Communicating with people that you cannot see. I don’t know how everyone else is doing it, but my company has always been kind of distant. The performers are all over California. So, we have had a really strong Facebook group since the day Facebook came out with groups.

Maya:

Wow.

Fae Gershenson:

We fill it with memes and crazy silly stuff all the time. So when I had to shift the whole message of like, hey y’all, you’re out of work today. Oh, weird. All of a sudden you have work again. But we have to subtly roll this out. So some people are still at home wondering why they don’t have shows, anyway, that’s my own thing, but…

Maya:

But it’s difficult and as a business owner, it’s one of those things where everyone’s experiencing this for the first time. We’re all in this boat just experiencing all of this at once, which makes things difficult. But I’m sure there’s business owners out here that appreciate hearing that. Even with the success you’re having, there’s still some struggles there, so I super appreciate that. If anyone has any questions for Fae, throw those in the chat, but we do have one more question for you, which is, for someone who also has a business that was fully person to person interaction before this, do you have any suggestions that you would give them for discovering an online opportunity or moving their business online?

Fae Gershenson:

You know how you’ve probably seen somebody else in your industry attempting it, oh, maybe you’re too late or something, or you can’t do it as great as they can. Don’t listen to that. Just be prepared to work your tail off, harder than you’ve ever worked before, and you will totally be fine. You’ll be fine. It’s incredible. Everyone in my industry is doing this. Not one of them is getting any bookings. So, it’s all about messaging.

Maya:

Absolutely. Well, that’s all we have, Fae. Thank you so much for being here.

Fae Gershenson:

Bye.

Maya:

Thank you for bringing your DigitalMarketer experience. If you want to reach Fae, she is in our engaged Facebook group so you can talk to her directly there and if you want to learn more about Happily Ever Laughter, the website is happilyeverlaughter.com.

Maya:

And next up, we have Patrick McCarthy. Patrick McCarthy is the owner of Inish Free Irish Dance. That’s an Austin based dance studio and we’re super excited to have him here to talk about his experience. He’s had to deal with St. Patrick’s Day getting canceled, which is a huge thing for the Irish dance community. So I’m excited to hear some of the pivots he’d made in his business as well. We’re going to give him one second. It looks like he might need some tech help. Patrick, can you hear me?

Patrick McCarthy:

I can. Hello.

Maya:

Oh, there you are. Hello there, how’s it going?

Patrick McCarthy:

Yeah, good, good. Oh, I’ve gone again.

Maya:

Well, good thing I can still hear you.

Patrick McCarthy:

Yeah, I’m here. I think I’ll pop back up.

Maya:

No worries. While that’s happening, can you tell me a little bit more about the Inish Free Irish Dance and your dance studio?

Patrick McCarthy:

Yeah, so we predominantly just teach Irish dancing. That’s kind of our thing. We’re not like those regular down studios that do ballet and tap and stuff like that. So we’re kind of a niche market. On our day to day, we are in studio teaching kids ranging from four years of age up to adults. So I teach in Austin, Texas, and San Antonio. And over the space of a week, I probably see 200 children-

Maya:

Oh, wow.

Patrick McCarthy:

In blips and doing private lessons and teen dancing, lots of different things.

Maya:

Absolutely. So, as soon as the pandemic hit, it kind of meant that St. Patrick’s Day, which I’m sure is a pretty big event that you guys are normally doing things for, was canceled. How did that go? How did you guys handle that?

Patrick McCarthy:

Well, we do a lot of steady contracted work for St. Patrick’s Day parades, lots of retirement facilities and they were one of the first kind of groups to cancel everything. I’m a physical therapist by trade, too, so I work in some of those settings. So, it was tough. It was tough because it’s one of the busiest time for the kids. We train a lot of performance time up to that point of the year and it was kind of quite quick that everything canceled. So, just for morale for the kids and stuff like that, it was tough for them not to be able to do any of their performances and have everything closed down at the same time.

Maya:

Absolutely. What is business looking like now? What are your plans for the near future?

Patrick McCarthy:

So, we’ve gone predominant, we’re pretty much done everything online now, so different platforms for doing classes online, doing private lessons online. We have a bit of an issue with, we obviously need to use the cameras but we’re using music, too, so one of the biggest things in dance is timing. So, it’s hard to have that perfect connection between the timing in the music and what you’re getting across lines. So we’re just doing as best we can. The kids are getting, one of the things we did was have them video all of their material and send them to us, and we just sit down and write notes about them. So we’re not having to do a two way conversation back and forth and not mess with the timing. But we also do Zoom classes, too. So, it’s worked good, and there are some definite benefits of doing it online.

Maya:

Absolutely, and I didn’t even think about the unique challenge that is of trying to cue up music and a live stream video at the same time. A lot of people are-

Patrick McCarthy:

Yeah, and then there’s also spacing on top of that because you have to have enough space to dance and a lot of these kids have maybe, I don’t know, live in apartments or have a garage, but it’s filled with all different types of junk, so…

Maya:

Absolutely. Well, as far as moving to video lessons and kind of moving your business that direction, do you see bringing any of the new things that you’re doing into your business for the future? Has any of it been so successful that you’re going to kind of keep up with it?

Patrick McCarthy:

So, at first I thought it was going to be a total nightmare doing this and I thought the parents, what we really did try to implement at first was to go above what we would normally do in classes. So, our classes are Mondays and Wednesdays and we knew that parents were being furloughed and parents were having to work from home, so they were going to have their kids at home with them all day and they’re having to do school work and then the parents had to do their work and then the parents have to try to do dance stuff on top.

Patrick McCarthy:

So, we give them lots of fun things that they could do, all the different levels and give them like Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday work that they could just spread it out. The parents knew that if they had conference calls they could give their kids this to watch on the iPad and then go learn on their own. So, I think we kind of just inundated them with more than they would be used to, just to kind of help out because we understood that everyone’s kind of in a top position with us. And then with the furloughed people, we also told them, if you can afford this, send your kids to these classes anyway and it’ll all come out in the wash in the end.

Maya:

Absolutely.

Patrick McCarthy:

The Zoom classes are good. One of the really good things is getting the parents to video them, send them in and us giving them written notes because they can then pop them up on their wall, read the written notes before they start, and they’re getting that visual feedback straight away before they start.

Maya:

Absolutely. So, I have one last question for you. For anyone out there who has a business, and I know there’s some members of our audience that have things like karate studios, dance studios, in person businesses like that. Do you have any suggestions to them about how to implement this kind of video lessons in their work?

Patrick McCarthy:

Well, my biggest piece of advice would be to ask other people for advice that are doing this. I think in this time, everyone understands that we’re all under a lot of pressure. Things are not going well for lots of businesses, and I’ve had friends that have reached out to me and asked what we’re doing and I’m happy to help them. You realize its everyone’s livelihoods and people are having to pay bills for their families. So I think there’s a lot of goodwill out there to help people. So, ask for advice, look for resources. There’s plenty of resources popping up everywhere. We have an Irish dancing resource with 600 teachers on it, all giving different ideas, and then the last thing is you just have to adapt to it. That’s all there is. We’re all in the same boat. Everyone understands. You’re not going out and just changing your business totally, and people are wondering why you’re doing it. They know that you’re doing it, and you’re trying to do the best for your business, best for your customers, and they’ll be responsive to that and they’ll appreciate it when it all comes back to normal.

Maya:

Absolutely. Thank you so much for being here, Patrick. I really appreciate it.

Patrick McCarthy:

You’re very welcome. You’re very welcome.

Maya:

And if you’re looking for more information about Inish Free Irish dance, you can find Patrick’s studio at irishdanceaustin.com.

Maya:

Next up, we have Candace Wendt from FoodHead Catering and Sandwiches. Candice’s business has been actually working with the City of Austin to provide care meals to young students and their families in Austin. So, she’s doing great things with her business and I’m super excited for her to tell you guys about it. So, let’s see here, if we can pull Candace in.

Candace Wendt:

There we go.

Maya:

There we go. How’s it going, Candice?

Candace Wendt:

It’s going great. How are you today, Maya?

Maya:

Doing good, doing good. So, just to hop right in here, can you tell me what FoodHead catering service would normally be doing if there were no pandemic? What would business look like?

Candace Wendt:

Okay, so we are a cafe and a catering service. So we have a cafe close to UT campus and probably, our catering is 50% of what we do though. One of our biggest customers is University of Texas, and in all their different departments and so when they went down, we kind of went down, and started to have to reinvent what we do and how we do it.

Maya:

Absolutely.

Candace Wendt:

We did do some online ordering already, but we have expanded that. We’ve also started some, honestly, our community has been what’s kept us going and actually kept us reinventing ourselves. We do this one thing called, Lunch Bunch, and it was a friend of mine, and at the beginning of this, I felt like I was being told, listen to people’s ideas. You don’t have to do them, but listen and keep an open mind, and she came to me and said, “What if just start doing this lunch group in our neighborhoods and people can post it on Next Door and you can have a point person as a host and we pick up food at their houses.” And I was like, “Okay, let’s figure it out.” Well, the first week we did it, it was I think close to $2,000 worth of business.

Maya:

Oh, wow.

Candace Wendt:

Just on that one day and for that one group, and so we’ve been doing that weekly ever since, and just the response of people wanting to help small business, and from that it’s inspired us to want to keep busy but also help others. So, the Texas Restaurant Association has a program that you were referring to that is the comfort care packages and those are also part of the Texas Network of Family and Youth Success Programs. And so, basically what they’re doing and not just us, many restaurants are doing this, they are connecting with families that have children at risk and that need help. And so, in turn the restaurants are also providing meals for them and the restaurants get to work and we also get to provide a nice meal for these families. Plus, we also add paper goods or something that might be helpful for them because right now, you can’t get toilet paper, you can’t get some paper towels. So, that is helpful.

Maya:

Right, that’s spectacular. What was the decision making process like for some of these pivots that you’ve had to make? You mentioned listening and listening to other people’s ideas even if you don’t do them, but what was your process like for deciding what to just listen to and what to do?

Candace Wendt:

Well, basically you had to do something and you needed do it quickly, and things were changing drastically or every day rather, and you were like, okay, so this is what’s safe for our community and for our employees. So, how do we change this? How do we implement this? How do we keep our community but distance ourselves in the way that we’ve been asked to do? So, implementing online, ordering curbside, which we do, still keeps us working, keeps us seeing our customers and also just the connection, of being able to do that. And the other programs we’re doing, we’re also doing some things with meeting healthcare workers and that’s another way we’re keeping involved in our community. I think the biggest thing, and I know I keep on talking about this is, just the opportunity that we’ve had to be involved just beyond ourselves, and if we didn’t do that, I honestly think that, if I couldn’t focus outwardly, that just focusing inwardly would make me crazy. Uh oh, I’ve lost you.

Maya:

There we go. Sorry. Dogs barking in the background. That is a really good point, is we’re all stuck here, you might as well kind of look outwardly and see what you can do for your community and help your business at the same time if you can. Have you seen any specific successes that you think you’re going to continue on in your business even after we can kind of start meeting in person again?

Candace Wendt:

I think so. I think we’ve always wanted, it’s two things. We’ve always wanted to do things where we gave back a little bit more and always have tried to figure out how that was going to work, and I think that we’ll probably implement more of those programs because I think not only, it brings your community together because you have a purpose-

Candace:

I think it’s just it brings your community together because you have a purpose. The other thing is that we were doing that lunch bunch and what right now we’re trying to do is come up with some more family meals and hot entree kind of things. It’ll be cold when it gets to your house, but you’ll heat them up. So that might be something that we can still keep those lunch bunches going because people will have evening meals.

Maya:

Right.

Candace:

They won’t probably have the daytime that they would use it, but they would have them deliver to their home and they’d be in an insulated bag and waiting for them as a convenience type food, but a healthy one.

Maya:

Absolutely. One last question here for you, unless someone in the chat has one, we’ll slip it in, but this is the last question for me. What are some steps or maybe suggestions you could recommend to people in a similar spot or a similar industry that are looking to find new avenues for their business?

Candace:

Like I said before, listen, flexible, being flexible. One day something right now, one day something works the next day it doesn’t seem to work. So being flexible with your plans and realizing that you might have to change weekly, daily, monthly what you’re doing. But we are going to make it through this and it’s going to be okay. Just rely upon your community, your social media community, but more importantly your personal community. Reach out to them, let them know what’s going on with you. Communication is huge-

Maya:

Absolutely.

Candace:

I think that those things are a good direction.

Maya:

Absolutely. Well, thank you so much for being here, Candace. If people are looking to find out more about your business and what you do, the website is foodheads.com right?

Candace:

Exactly.

Maya:

Absolutely. Well, thank you again. Super appreciate your time. Next up here we have Grace Nicholas from Crux Climbing Center. Crux is a climbing center based in Austin, Texas and it’s an in-person climbing gym where people go to climb. So you can imagine they’ve had to make a lot of changes considering everything that’s going on. So I’m super excited to hear Grace talk about some of the new programs are instituting and some of the changes that they’ve made to their business in this time. So let’s see if we can get Grace in here. One second and thanks for being patient to the audience and to our speakers as we work our way through this. 10 people is a lot to handle so I appreciate you being patient with us and working through it. Let me see here.

Jenna:

It looks I can’t bring Grace up but we do have our next panelist Kendall ready?

Maya:

No problem.

Jenna:

Kendall just let me know if you feel good about me bringing you up right now? Just put it in the chat. All right, she is ready to go. Here we go.

Maya:

Thanks Jenna. All right. We’ll give [crosstalk 01:12:31] Hi. How’s it going?

Kendall:

Hi, Maya, hanging in here. Thank you Jenna for getting me on. I currently have children literally corralled in my house. I’ve now been booted outside. There’s dogs barking, construction, so there’s a lot going on.

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Maya:

We’re all experiencing the same thing. I just had to mute myself because my dog was growling at someone walking past. So I feel your pain. Thank you so much for being patient with us.

Kendall:

Yeah.

Maya:

So I am-

Kendall:

Hope that’s okay. That’s just, it’s 3:00 on COVID time whatever.

Maya:

It is always okay. 3:00 on COVID is the constant state of being. I am so excited to talk to you and about Antonelli’s Cheese. Also, so is all of DigitalMarketer. We’re based in Austin. We know Antonelli’s and if you could just tell our audience a little bit about what you guys normally do.

Kendall Antonelli:

Sure. We are a cut to order cheese shop. We just celebrated our 10th anniversary in February. I clearly made too many jokes about, “Yay! We hit 10, we can retire.” Because then COVID hit and were like, “No wait.” [crosstalk 01:13:37] “Let’s hang on.” So what does it cut to order cheese shop? It’s like an ice cream shop but you can come in and taste everything for free and fun. Then if you something we cut it to order, which keeps the cheese better. We support smaller producers from around the United States and globally. Then we, in addition to our cheese shop, which we do cheese, and meat, and beer, and wine, and honeys, and preserves, we also have an events house across the street where we do about 200 to 300 cheese tasting classes per year and private events.

Maya:

Oh wow.

Kendall Antonelli:

We have a third location, which is our warehouse. Out of there we do… We supply artisanal foods to about 150 local restaurants or central Texas restaurants. We run our e-commerce out of there as well. So we have three physical locations so we have four revenue lines.

Maya:

Absolutely. So you mentioned that you have the live event, so you have a couple of locations. How is business working now that the stay at home order is in place?

Kendall Antonelli:

Oh my goodness. Just we were hearing some of the other speakers, it’s like reliving it and I already have tried to bury that. But around that March 20th, 19th day, 20th day everything became real in Austin when South by Southwest was canceled. So for us [crosstalk 01:14:54] was canceled, it doesn’t bring a lot of traffic to our retail, but it canceled all of our wholesale program. So all of our restaurants, which had, had us ordered for them, of course it was hundreds of thousands of pounds of cheese that was canceled on and we can’t hold them accountable to it. They’re in the same boat we are. So we lost half of our business revenue overnight. Quickly had to start making some pivots there. Then we just looked at other area’s we’re in Seattle, we tried to quickly stay ahead of the game and make a lot of quick adjustments before.

Kendall Antonelli:

So one of the things we did strategically is instead of saying, “What could happen? Or let’s wait until shelter in place and then we’ll put something else.” We just said, “Here’s the five different zones and levels of what Mayor Adler, our mayor might declare.” We started moving through those and then we said, “Heck with it, let’s jump to five and already be working through these systems.” So before it was ever mandated, we kicked customers out of our shop. We launched online orders, we set up a call center, which we’ve never done before. Which sounds easy and is actually really challenging as a small business and you have to pay labor for somebody to sit there on a phone and hold it. Curbside delivery into trunks really quickly.

Kendall Antonelli:

Then one of our quickest moves was then all of our events got canceled. I heard some other folks talking about this. So we did tastings where we take 50 people out to a farm and we couldn’t all get on a bus and do that. So we transitioned all of those virtual tastings right now. Instead they have skyrocketed, they always sold out and now we have doubled down in retail, and we have doubled down and events. So both of those programs are really real well. Which is good because it’s making up for our huge lost revenues. So in the end we’re saying we’re working four times as hard for a quarter of the money. At the end of the day we’re just hoping we break even. But we’ve been luckily able to hold on to all of our team.

Maya:

That’s spectacular. I have to say the online tastings kind of set this whole call in motion because one of my teammates did an online tasting, and told all of us about it. We all want it to do one. So that honestly is what inspired us to look at how businesses are getting creative with how they do things. So I was going to ask if it was successful, but it sounds like yes.

Kendall Antonelli:

Yeah. I don’t know we’ve been asked what will we keep after when things go back to normal? There’s never a normal in entrepreneurship.

Maya:

Right.

Kendall Antonelli:

I have a guest who might walk in front of the screen okay. He has decided not to. Homeschooling is not going well today. So I don’t know, we’ll never be able to… I guess if I’m looking on the bright side what has been great is a lot of stuff was in our business plan. We eventually wanted to launch Cheesemonger Live. We’ve had that domain for five years. It’s basically for people who can’t access and come into the shop that they could still experience cheeses the same way.

Kendall Antonelli:

So you call in and visually see the case and we talk you through the tastes and flavors and you can select it that way and we’ll still cut it to order. So we just went ahead and launched that. The classes, I don’t think we’ll ever take back people now… I guess one of the cool things, sorry that was distracting-

Maya:

You’re fine.

Kendall Antonelli:

Out of all of this, I know everybody, my plumbing is out, which is why the plumbers are here. So I just watch my child run into my front lawn and go to the bathroom and run back and I’m trying… They don’t need to know, but now you all know I have no secrets. The amazing thing is we have always, our goal has been to spread joy and it just so happens that we get to do that through cheese. We launched the virtual tastings as a way to just keep that program afloat. We could not afford to give back all that revenue. That was cash we’d already received. So we went to it because we had to. But now the amazing part is people are saying “I have nothing else to do and I just got to celebrate my 50th wedding anniversary with you guys, so thank you for giving us something to do. Thank you for breaking up the monotony.”

Maya:

Absolutely.

Kendall Antonelli:

So we’re getting to still see [crosstalk 00:09:55]. Then it’s the part I don’t think we can ever take back because it’s connecting people across the United States. So now this weekend, this week we shipped out cheese tastings in a box to 20 different locations across the United States and they’re all celebrating the fact that one woman just finished her chemo cancer treatments.

Maya:

Oh that’s amazing.

Kendall Antonelli:

[crosstalk 01:19:15] lead a live tasting for her, but they’re all in different places across the United States. So we’ve just now found a new way to bring it all together. It’s just been exhausting like everybody else said.

Maya:

That’s spectacular though. You guys were doing amazing. I do have one question from the chat from multiple people who asked, how do you do a virtual tasting? So if you could just break down what that means.

Kendall Antonelli:

Yes, that is a great question. Because we’ve been doing these Facebook Live events and I’m like, “If you’re just tuning in, no people are not just sitting here watching me eat cheese. So locally in Austin you buy your ticket and then you come and you still pick up a cheese plate and so you pop your trunk. We don’t ever touch each other. We put it in the back of your trunk. You go home and you tune in at a certain time and we will guide you through the tasting. So we’re talking about the makers and how they made it, how it’s a labor of love. Our American cheese makers and all of our artists and producers are really hurting. It’s really commodities that are thriving right now and we’re losing a lot of farms through this.

Kendall Antonelli:

So now telling your story is more important now than ever. So people are getting a taste through it with us and we’re giving them science behind the cheese. We’re giving them theories on how to pair, and most importantly we’re just trying to connect with people in these isolating times. So virtual cheese tasting class is that you have a physical plate in front of you. Then you tune in with us and we’re talking you through a tasting. So now that’s why we’ve launched the 2.0 version where we will ship it to you and then you can join in on a tasting as well.

Maya:

Got it. Absolutely. Well Candace… Oh I’m sorry not Candace. Candace was before you.

Maya:

It’s fine. Kendall, we have one last question for you if no one else in the chat has anything to say. But for people that are looking to do a similar pivot, it’s the same question we asked everybody. Do you have any suggestions or any advice?

Kendall Antonelli:

Sure. This is not exactly answering your question, but I’m always off script.

Maya:

Go for it.

Kendall Antonelli:

I think any business should be doing right now is I am trying to intentionally support locally owned businesses, but if you don’t have your website updated, or your Instagram or… So for instance on our Instagram we just changed our profile and it just says open daily 11-6 pm here’s how to support us. So right now I think there’s a lot of people out there, there are a lot of people out there who want to support you, but if they don’t know how you just have to make it as easy as possible. So putting that, we created a whole tab on our website that says COVID-19 and on it, it just has how you can support us. It’s literally the information you find anywhere else on the website. It’s just bullet-by-bullet by this box, join this class, order online here.

Kendall Antonelli:

So making it as clear as possible to people and then staying… I’m so sick of my phone and my computer, but… And we don’t have a fancy marketing company, but I’m staying glued to it and responding to every inquiry and request I have right now. So that’s just people want to support you and trying to make sure that your messaging is out there in a way that they know how to support you. I think my biggest advice is giving ourselves a lot of grace. It doesn’t have to be perfect. We are repeating to ourselves this mantra which we read in a book, the Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod, who now lives in Austin. Quick, easy read, great business book. But it’s “Progress, not perfection.” So for so long we had put off a lot of these things because we needed them to be perfect, Have the right software, and the most high-tech awesome thing for the cheapest cost.

Kendall Antonelli:

All that went out the door, the day the pandemic hit. We were like, we need to do it now. It doesn’t matter if we have duct tape it to the door, we’re going to figure it out. Because we’ve stayed true to our voice and our branding that I don’t think has taken a hit for it. So I think it’s make it easy for people to support you. Give yourself grace and then it doesn’t have to be perfect to go for it and just celebrate our wins. Everybody celebrate our wins.

Maya:

Woo! That is a DigitalMarketer, core value. So that is right on brand with us. Kendall it was a joy talking to you. I had a great time. Thank you so much for being here.

Kendall Antonelli:

Thank y’all! Way to go the other business owners.

Maya:

For people that are looking to learn more about Antonelli’s Cheese Shop and to do a virtual tasting. I’m sure we’re all excited to do that now, antonellischeese.com is the website. So next up, last but not least is Grace Nicholas from Crux Climbing Center. Grace is in their marketing department and they have recently implemented some new sort of membership options for how people that can’t physically go to their climbing gym can still support them. So I’m super excited to have you here. Grace, thank you for being patient with us as we kind of work our way through these interviews. Thanks for being here. Oh, there you are. Can you say me or can you hear me?

Grace Nicholas:

Hi. I’m not hearing anything.

Maya:

Oh no.

Grace Nicholas:

One second. I’m not sure.

Maya:

No worries. We’ll give her some time to get that fixed. Let’s see. Jenna might be sending you a message to see if we can get you up and running.

Grace Nicholas:

Let’s try, then.

Maya:

Did that help? Can you hear me?

Grace Nicholas:

Yes I can.

Maya:

Woo!

Grace Nicholas:

There we go.

Maya:

Absolutely. Well thank you so much and it’s Grace Nichols.

Grace Nicholas:

Nicholas, there’s an A at the end but-

Maya:

Okay. We’ll fix. So thank you so much for being here. Thank you for being patient as we work our way through these interviews. I’m thinking we saved the best for last here. I’m very excited to hear about the things that y’all have going on, especially because I have some coworkers that go to Crux Climbing Center and love it very much. So, can you tell us a little bit about what business was before the pandemic?

Grace Nicholas:

Yeah, we are a climbing gym that has a membership monthly subscription as you would say. We also have pay in full and day pass drop-ins. We do a kids program. We were in the middle of our spring break camp. We have yoga, fitness, climbing classes, and a retail section. So there’s a lot of different revenue streams for our business.

Maya:

Got it. Absolutely. And so now you’ve pivoted your membership strategy because people can’t come to the gym at all. So can you tell me a little bit about what kind of changes you guys have made there?

Grace Nicholas:

Yeah, so a lot of gyms have done different versions of opt in or opt out. We decided that we’re going to freeze everybody and if they want to opt in, they’re allowed to opt in to keep their memberships going to support us and our staff during this time. In that process we said for everyone that will opt in to keep a membership, once we’re back open, then we will give a membership to somebody in our community that’s been affected by this COVID situation.

Maya:

Absolutely. What was the decision making process for that? How did you guys decide to go with the keep a membership given membership?

Grace Nicholas:

Yeah, we knew a lot of businesses were hurting, including ourselves and were… But more importantly that our community was hurting and how we can help them and support them. The other thought process being that if we return and only some of our membership comes back because they’re the ones that could afford it, it just seems so sad to us to think that when we get to come back not everybody would get to. That’s not fair. So we were like, obviously this will help us get the doors back open when we’re able to, and then we can also give that appreciation back, pay it forward.

Maya:

Absolutely. I absolutely love that. What kind of response have you seen to that from your members?

Grace Nicholas:

It’s been great, so we launched it after we decided to do the opt in section, but we saw pretty much double the amount of people that were opting in opted in after we launched that so.

Maya:

Oh wow.

Grace Nicholas:

Yeah, so-

Maya:

Absolutely.

Grace Nicholas:

It’s a great response.

Maya:

Absolutely. That’s so good to hear. If anyone has any questions for Grace, just a reminder to throw that in the chat for Michelle, but we do have one last question here for you, which is just for anyone that’s in a similar business, even if it’s specifically a gym,, or a personal trainer or something that, do you have any specific advice for them?

Grace Nicholas:

Right now I think community engagement is huge, so we offer our online yoga and fitness for free. We’re just trying to think of different ways to engage people in this time where people are still seeking out fitness. So you’re still top of mind, which is nice. Maybe not as top of mind as sport events, and like restaurants, and other businesses.

Maya:

Right.

Grace Nicholas:

But the fact that people still need fitness is great. I think right now any business, it’s how you treat your customers, how you treat your staff during this time is going to be a huge reflection. I think a lot of your customers base will value how you handle this situation.

Maya:

Absolutely. I think you’re 100% spot on with that. It doesn’t look we have any questions from the chat, so thank you so much Grace for being here. I think you had some excellent advice that people should really take. Especially, if they’re in that industry that’s very in-person and just kind of getting creative and listening to their customers. I think that’s absolutely amazing. If you are in Austin area and you want to check out Crux climbing center, it is cruxclimbingcenter.com correct?

Grace Nicholas:

Yes.

Maya:

Absolutely. Well, thank you so much for being here. I appreciate your time.

Grace Nicholas:

Yeah, thank you.

Maya:

All right y’all. Thank you so much for hanging in here for this office hours/insider training. This has been an absolutely wonderful experience to get to talk to you. All of these entrepreneurs making things work for them and taking lemons and making them into lemonade. So thank you to all of our panelists. Thank you to Michelle for being in the chat and keeping things running. Thank you Jenna for managing our speakers and keeping things as organized as we could possibly make it. Thank you to our audience for attending and we’ll see you next time. Thanks so much. Bye.

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